Current Indigenous Top Ten

July 27, 2016

ON Métis students engage with re-enactment site to gain deeper knowledge of cultural identity

25 Métis students from across Ontario spent a week immersed in Métis history and culture at Old Fort William Historical Park in Thunder Bay this summer. The program was part of the sixth annual Métis Nation of Ontario’s Summer Youth Cultural Program training, which aimed to bestow a greater understanding of the Métis way-of-life as it was 200 years ago. The students used the opportunity to interact directly with a re-enactment site set in the year 1815 and engage in workshops on everything from canoe building, fish cleaning, blacksmithing, and Michif language to artisan crafts like mukuk making, tinsmithing, and beading. “The program gives the youth numerous opportunities to experience what it is to be Métis in a way they’ve never experienced before and to explore their identities in a new way,” said Scott Carpenter, MNO Manager of Education, Way of Life and Special Projects. NationTalk

uSask Aboriginal students explore cultural identity through immersion in Chinese society, language

A new program at the University of Saskatchewan aims to foster a sense of cultural identity among Aboriginal students while offering them the chance to explore Chinese culture and language. This summer, the Aboriginal Student China Study Tour brought a group of 20 students and two staff members to Beijing and Xi’an, China to visit universities and elementary schools while learning conversational Mandarin. Before returning to Canada, the students also took a standardized test that ranks non-native speakers on their language skills. “We had some people who were treaty and some who were not full status Indigenous,” said engineering student Chennoa Tracey, who is Métis. “I got to see different kinds of Aboriginal groups as well as the Chinese culture, so it was good for me in both senses.” uSask

Delay in construction of First Nations school raises concerns

First Nations parents in Toronto are concerned about the delays in the construction of a unique K-12 First Nations school, reports the Toronto Star. It has been a year since the Toronto District School Board agreed to open the proposed school, but parents now say that construction has yet to start and that many First Nations children still do not have the supports they need to finish secondary school. The Star reports that part of the delay is due to the discovery that the school’s proposed home, Eastern Commerce Collegiate, resembles a residential school and would need $40M in renovations to be made into a welcoming environment for First Nations learners and their families. Director of Education John Malloy says that the school board is looking into whether it is more feasible to construct an entirely new building for the school. “I’m sure it’s hard not to become impatient, but we value the community’s vision of an ‘indigenized’ learning environment, and we’re trying to figure out the best way to get there together,” said Malloy. Toronto Star

Lakehead Indigenous learning centre moves forward with $1M from ON

Lakehead University has received a $1M grant to help build a new facility devoted to increasing academic opportunities for First Nations, Métis, and Inuit students. The funds, issued by the Northern Ontario Heritage Fund Corporation, will allow Lakehead to move into the design and engineering phase of the Gichi Kendaasiwin Centre, which will reportedly include classroom and meeting spaces, a gathering and performance space, and support services for Indigenous students and community members. “Lakehead takes pride in connecting our Indigenous students to the world,” said Lakehead President Brian Stevenson. “It is wonderful to see Ontario’s government appreciate and support our hard work with this investment." CBC |  ON |  NationTalk |  Lakehead

UVic Indigenous language program launched at USask

The University of Victoria offers a one-of-a-kind Master’s Degree program in Indigenous languages that is now available at the University of Saskatchewan. The program, which has launched with 20 enrolled students, will help students develop the skills needed to save and preserve Indigenous languages. "We are very excited to host our colleagues from Victoria," said U of S Director of First Nations and Métis Relations Joan Greyeyes. "Partnerships with other institutions are vital, especially when we share a common goal such as Indigenous language preservation and revitalization." UVic Director of Indigenous Education in the Faculty of Education Onowa McIvor states that “our vision is to work together with our university partner and the group of students who are already leaders in language revitalization who are now training to become ambassadors and visionaries and to truly lead the charge of the language revitalization movement in Saskatchewan.” CBC

The University of Victoria offers a one-of-a-kind Master’s Degree program in Indigenous languages that is now available at the University of Saskatchewan. The program, which has launched with 20 enrolled students, will help students develop the skills needed to save and preserve Indigenous languages. "We are very excited to host our colleagues from Victoria," said U of S Director of First Nations and Métis Relations Joan Greyeyes. "Partnerships with other institutions are vital, especially when we share a common goal such as Indigenous language preservation and revitalization." UVic Director of Indigenous Education in the Faculty of Education Onowa McIvor states that “our vision is to work together with our university partner and the group of students who are already leaders in language revitalization who are now training to become ambassadors and visionaries and to truly lead the charge of the language revitalization movement in Saskatchewan.”

CBC


Graduation coaches to ease transition for Indigenous high school students

The public school board in Thunder Bay, ON is launching a pilot project where graduation coaches will help Indigenous students, especially those from remote communities, transition smoothly from primary school to secondary school. Board Superintendent of Education Sherri-Lynne Pharand explains that similar programs have been successful in Edmonton, AB and Kenora, ON, and that this will be piloted for five years so that the board can follow the students entering grade nine through to their graduation. The coaches will be accessible to Indigenous students, including those already in high school, year round and outside of school hours. "Whatever it is that the students require support with, the graduation coach will be there to support them, and it really will be based on an individual plan, really getting to know each and every student," said Pharand.

CBC


Indigenous youth earn high school credits, build respect at police academy

In a program called “Oskayak,” which is Cree for youth, Indigenous youth from across Alberta work alongside Edmonton Police Service officers in an academy program intended to build relationships between the two groups. "It's a really good program, it taught me leadership and how to get out of my comfort zone," said Theron Auigbelle of the Alexander First Nation, who added that the class gave him both exposure to cultural activities and insight into police work. The program is said to benefit both parties, as police officers learn more about Indigenous youth while the students build relationships with them and develop the confidence they need to become role models in their communities. According to teacher Terris Mah, one of the key parts of the program is providing a hands-on teaching of values and showing students the importance of not simply being a bystander. Students who participate earn high school credits for volunteerism and leadership. 

CBC


Brandon Aboriginal Council signs MOU with BrandonU, City of Brandon to help close education, employment gaps

The Brandon Urban Aboriginal Peoples’ Council has signed an MOU with Brandon University and the City of Brandon to bolster ongoing conversation about Brandon’s urban Aboriginal community. The MOU contains specific goals relating to the development and implementation of an Aboriginal Economic Strategic Plan that intends to improve Aboriginal education, labour market participation, and access to business initiatives. The agreement also aims to establish long-term collaborations to help close Aboriginal education and employment gaps. “Signing this MOU marks a significant milestone for the Brandon Urban Aboriginal Peoples’ Council, as we commit to working collaboratively with our partners and citizens on keeping attention focused on important initiatives and supports for the Aboriginal community here in Brandon,” said Brandon Urban Aboriginal Peoples’ Council Aboriginal Community Coordinator Jason Gobeil.

BrandonU


Laurentian to include new Indigenous centre in $51M campus modernization

Laurentian University is working to better support current students and attract new ones with a new $51M campus construction project, reports CBC. Now entering its final stages, the project will include a new Executive Learning Centre, University Club, main campus entrance, and an Indigenous sharing and learning centre to support the school’s more than 1,000 Indigenous students. Laurentian Executive Director of Facility Services Brad Parkes explains that the last time Laurentian made upgrades to its campus was in the 1960’s. Many of the new facilities and renovations are expected to be completed by the beginning of the fall semester.

CBC


Fleming, Trent partner to provide more teachers with background in Aboriginal ways of knowing

Fleming College and Trent University are working to increase the number of educators who have a meaningful understanding of Aboriginal knowledge and perspectives. The two schools recently signed an agreement that will allow eligible graduates of Fleming’s General Arts and Science—University Transfer program to receive advanced standing in Trent’s new Indigenous Bachelor of Education Program. “Through this pathway, we will support Indigenous learners who are looking to fast-track from College into this specialized Bachelor of Education degree,” said Cathy Bruce, dean of the School of Education and Professional Learning at Trent University.

Fleming


Where higher ed meets top talent

LATEST OPPORTUNITIES

Dean of Arts, Business and Science

University College of the North, Thompson, MB, Canada

 

Learning Technologies Facilitator

University College of the North, The Pas, MB, Canada

 

Mamawechetotan Centre Coordinator

University College of the North, The Pas, MB, Canada

 

Faculty of Arts, Business and Science Instructor

University College of the North, Thompson, MB, Canada

 

Social Sciences Instructor

University College of the North, Thompson or The Pas, MB, Canada

 

Field Placement Instructor, Kenanow Faculty of Education

University College of the North, The Pas, MB, Canada

 

Regional Principal - Nechako

College of New Caledonia, Vanderhoof or Fort St. James, BC, Canada

 

Regional Principal - Lakes District

College of New Caledonia, Burns Lake, BC, Canada


Operations Manager - Nechako

College of New Caledonia, Vanderhoof or Fort St. James, BC, Canada


Academica Careers connects higher ed with top talent. Share your career opportunity with more than 2,321 college and university professionals, or find a challenging new career.

Visit Academica Careers today →

Graduation coaches to ease transition for Indigenous high school students

The public school board in Thunder Bay, ON is launching a pilot project where graduation coaches will help Indigenous students, especially those from remote communities, transition smoothly from primary school to secondary school. Board Superintendent of Education Sherri-Lynne Pharand explains that similar programs have been successful in Edmonton, AB and Kenora, ON, and that this will be piloted for five years so that the board can follow the students entering grade nine through to their graduation. The coaches will be accessible to Indigenous students, including those already in high school, year round and outside of school hours. "Whatever it is that the students require support with, the graduation coach will be there to support them, and it really will be based on an individual plan, really getting to know each and every student," said Pharand. CBC

Indigenous youth earn high school credits, build respect at police academy

In a program called “Oskayak,” which is Cree for youth, Indigenous youth from across Alberta work alongside Edmonton Police Service officers in an academy program intended to build relationships between the two groups. "It's a really good program, it taught me leadership and how to get out of my comfort zone," said Theron Auigbelle of the Alexander First Nation, who added that the class gave him both exposure to cultural activities and insight into police work. The program is said to benefit both parties, as police officers learn more about Indigenous youth while the students build relationships with them and develop the confidence they need to become role models in their communities. According to teacher Terris Mah, one of the key parts of the program is providing a hands-on teaching of values and showing students the importance of not simply being a bystander. Students who participate earn high school credits for volunteerism and leadership. CBC

Brandon Aboriginal Council signs MOU with BrandonU, City of Brandon to help close education, employment gaps

The Brandon Urban Aboriginal Peoples’ Council has signed an MOU with Brandon University and the City of Brandon to bolster ongoing conversation about Brandon’s urban Aboriginal community. The MOU contains specific goals relating to the development and implementation of an Aboriginal Economic Strategic Plan that intends to improve Aboriginal education, labour market participation, and access to business initiatives. The agreement also aims to establish long-term collaborations to help close Aboriginal education and employment gaps. “Signing this MOU marks a significant milestone for the Brandon Urban Aboriginal Peoples’ Council, as we commit to working collaboratively with our partners and citizens on keeping attention focused on important initiatives and supports for the Aboriginal community here in Brandon,” said Brandon Urban Aboriginal Peoples’ Council Aboriginal Community Coordinator Jason Gobeil. BrandonU

Laurentian to include new Indigenous centre in $51M campus modernization

Laurentian University is working to better support current students and attract new ones with a new $51M campus construction project, reports CBC. Now entering its final stages, the project will include a new Executive Learning Centre, University Club, main campus entrance, and an Indigenous sharing and learning centre to support the school’s more than 1,000 Indigenous students. Laurentian Executive Director of Facility Services Brad Parkes explains that the last time Laurentian made upgrades to its campus was in the 1960’s. Many of the new facilities and renovations are expected to be completed by the beginning of the fall semester. CBC

Fleming, Trent partner to provide more teachers with background in Aboriginal ways of knowing

Fleming College and Trent University are working to increase the number of educators who have a meaningful understanding of Aboriginal knowledge and perspectives. The two schools recently signed an agreement that will allow eligible graduates of Fleming’s General Arts and Science—University Transfer program to receive advanced standing in Trent’s new Indigenous Bachelor of Education Program. “Through this pathway, we will support Indigenous learners who are looking to fast-track from College into this specialized Bachelor of Education degree,” said Cathy Bruce, dean of the School of Education and Professional Learning at Trent University. Fleming